Events

Join Us Every First Thursday in the Gallery


Teach Me to Believe:
Acrylic Paintings by William Hernandez

TMTB350PXExhibited through September 2, 2014

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“Teach Me to Believe” is an exhibit of the newest work by Portland-based Peruvian artist, William Hernandez. Opening night, meet the artist, William Hernandez, whose artworks are in private collections in Spain, Lima, Germany, Guatemala, Chile and of course, the United States. His style is transformational, surreal and breathtaking; this is a “must see” show for collectors, especially those who love Peruvian art and culture. Join our FB Event for this month-long celebration of the colors of Peru and Portland. Invite your friends!

This new body of work produced primarily within the last year, focuses on color-rich and magical urban life. Through his use of color, Hernandez alludes to his experiences as a Peruvian artist in Portland, depicting a diverse world of relationships, both imaginary and representational. William Hernandez offers to us in this current series his magical color palette, the hues and tones of real life. Hernandez has the ability to capture dreamlike qualities in his visionary figurative painting. His pieces are sometimes surreal and always playful.

William Hernandez trained at Lima’s Escuela Nacional de Bellas Artes (1995-2002), and moved to Portland in 2009. The work of William Hernandez has been exhibited in galleries and cultural centers from Lima to Portland, including Instituto Cultural Peruano Norteamericano, Centro Cultural de Espana, and several venues around Portland. In 2007 and 2008, he participated in the U.S. Embassy’s Noche de Arte: the largest art exhibition in Peru, a show that generates funds for the United States Agency for International Development (USAID). In 2011, his work was exhibited throughout La Luna Nueva festival, a Portland event sponsored by PGE Foundation, The Oregonian, and supported in part by a grant from the Oregon Arts Commission and the National Endowment for the Arts. His work has been covered by numerous publications, including Diario EL Comercio (Peru), and many more journals and blogs.

Aside from painting, Hernandez worked as a graphic designer for both public and international institutions in Lima and worked as an art teacher for El Museo de Arte. Since moving to Portland, Hernandez has shown art at many cafes, stores and galleries throughout Portland. He was one of the organizers for the first Intercambio de Artistas Latinos (Latin American Artists Exchange), which aims to create a network of artists in the Northwest to share ideas, expression and art.

Visit family-owned Pearl Gallery & Framing

Gallery Hours:
9 a.m. – 5 p.m. Weekdays
11 a.m. – 5 p.m. Saturdays
Every First Thursday until 9 p.m.

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In addition to our featured artists, we have gifts and a large selection of fine art to brighten your life! You can discover something for everyone: silver rings, glass pendants, images of Portland, locally made photo coasters, botanical etchings, original chalk pastels, ceramics, metal sculptures, mini-encaustics, hand-pulled Rock & Roll screen prints, fine art prints, ready-made frames and much more!  We are happy to work with you personally to frame your art, or envision the perfect art combination to liven up the space in your home or office.

UPCOMING EXHIBIT:

Beautoxacillin:  A Remedy for Beautybuda

Oil Paintings by Khanh N. Huynh, MD

Beer & Wine Reception:
1st Thursday, September 4, 2014
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Exhibited September 4 to September 30, 2014

Beauty as a concept has been neglected in mainstream contemporary art and even ridiculed mercilessly over the last century.  However, there is a small fraction of modern artists who still embrace and faithfully record the wonders of nature in a realistic style.  Khanh N. Huynh is one of those artists.

Huynh, a practicing physician and self-taught artist, paints common subjects, both figurative work and still life images of topics that might be considered mundane or ordinary, for example, a baby, a cow, a flower or an orange, but takes these subjects to new heights with a technique called alla prima brushwork. An Italian term meaning “first time,”  alla prima is a method of oil painting in which a picture is completed by painting on the entire surface of the canvas all at once rather than traditional method which required a methodical building of the image piecemeal fashion with successive layers of paint.

Beautoxacillin: A Remedy for Beauty is a collection of oil paintings celebrating the intoxicating beauty of simple life. Using realism as his philosophy and alla prima brushwork as his method, artist Khanh N. Huynh, MD transforms “slice of life” concepts into beautiful paintings with the hope of remediating subjects that are sometimes considered too commonplace for fine art.

 


 

Previous Events


Please inquire about art from previous exhibits.  We archive some work by each artist.

Animal Energy; Spiritual Landscapes
Oil Paintings by Debra Shaffer

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Exhibited July 2014

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“I am fascinated by all things in Nature and the interplay of the physical realm and other realms — dreams, Spirit, imagination.” – Debra Shaffer

Pearl Gallery & Framing is showing the latest oil paintings of Debra Shaffer, an artist with formal training in shamanism and sociology. Opening night, our artist reception features musical artist Xavier Tavera and the Classic Band, and beer options from our neighbor, Deschutes Brewing. By definition, a shaman encounters and interacts with the spirit world and channels these transcendental energies into this world. Viewing Debra Shaffer’s work is an invitation to commerce with Nature for healing. These boldly colored oil paintings capture the Spirit of their subjects, the animal’s heart or the landscape’s history and presence, in a way that fills us with the energy of their lives. According to Debra Shaffer, she became an artist out of her desire to share and ground her spiritual and Shamanic work. This show includes many animals from around the world, alongside landscapes derived from an extended time in New Mexico. The power, magic and color of a spiritual life is translated into these paintings that run along a continuum from realism to surrealism.

The Birds: Paintings by Alejandro Ceballos

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Exhibited June 2014

“What is important for me in art is not to reproduce reality, but to express the meaning of it.” — Alejandro Ceballos

Pearl Gallery & Framing is thrilled to host Mexico-born international artist, Alejandro Ceballos. The paintings included in this exhibit are whimsical yet romantic, colorful and playful.  Ceballos’ paintings belong to many private and public collections in Mexico, the USA, and Europe, and were shown at the Portland Art Museum in 2013. He is known for his murals, such as the the Park Avenue and Rocco’s Pizza painting created in 1996, and murals at Trillium and Applegate Schools. Since 1991, Ceballos has produced murals and shown exhibitions in Mexico and the Pacific Northwest – some venues include art galleries in NW Portland (1992-96), The Park Avenue (1992), La Salle University (1994), House of Culture -Hermosillo Sonora (1996), Oregon Council for Hispanic Advancement (1997), Interstate Firehouse Cultural Center (1998), Washington State University in Vancouver (1999), Oregon State University (2004), Lake Oswego (2005), Marylhurst University (2007), Newport Visual Arts Center (2010), Farragut Park Mural (2012), and Portland Art Museum (2013). Other solo and collective exhibitions include Guadalajara, Mexico City and the State of Sonora, Mexico. Commissions include: Album Covers, posters, animation and post cards, murals and Paintings: (1998-2013).

 

industek visions ? : urban landscapes

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Urban Visions Crossover : Large-scale Collaborative Photographic Prints
by Tekoah Buchanan & Brian Carter

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Exhibited April & May 2014

Pearl Gallery & Framing is excited to feature collaborative work that combines Tekoah Buchanan’s stunning large-scale photographic images with an image layering technique unique to collaborator Brian Carter; their merged talents achieve nostalgic-looking representations of Portland in today’s times. This exhibit showcases trains, landscapes and waterways of Portland. The development of the steam locomotive transformed the world. The “iron horse” carried many people and goods at unprecedented speeds all around the globe. America’s first steam-powered railroad, the Baltimore & Ohio opened in 1830, and within decades hundreds of thousands of railway miles crisscrossed the nation. Today, about two hundred years later, railroads continue to play a key role in our lives, moving millions of carloads of freight each year. The laying of tracks and railroad expansion is much like the process for Buchanan and Carter. Buchanan takes the still shot as if he is laying tracks for Carter, who moves the piece into new territories that are both expansive and ephemeral. The industrial photography of Tekoah Buchanan is taken to new levels at the hands of Brian Carter, whose urban landscapes series has received regional acclaim, and whose artistic expertise is reflected in these representations.

About the Artists

Tekoah Buchanan shares images that reveal his lifelong quest to translate our fast-paced industrial world into pictorial works, revealing the beauty of our everyday world. A graduate of University of Oregon’s Electronic Media Production program, Buchanan is obsessed with photography and film. His photographic eye is constantly trained on the world around him; he is a natural at capturing city scenes. He has spent countless hours in the darkroom, experimented with emulsion techniques, and worked on video production. Buchanan’s roots are in film and video, having mixed Super 8 Film shorts with video footage in his college days. He became intrigued with the idea of stopping film, and he began to create several series of still image photos from the footage that would typically be seen only as moving pictures. In his own words, “There is a constant moving vision for me to continue to create something new, yet reflective of the past, timeless. The thought of the end product, the art piece, being a collaboration of two artists at one time in history defines a new vision for me.”

Brian Carter is a Pacific Northwest graphic artist and illustrator. His work reveals beautifully layered images, offering a vivid spectrum of colors, urban environments with dramatic lighting styles and distinctive local landscapes. Carter loved to draw since he was a boy and was introduced to the world of computers at age ten. It wasn’t long before he began experimenting with “code” to create colorful drawings and designs. His interest began with a computer aided drafting course in High School. Carter went on to earn his degree in Graphic Design from the Art Institute of Portland. The degree led him to the printing industry. His career as a printing operator and color work specialist have focused his eye for detail and helped to push his art to new levels. Carter owns and operates Pearl Printing, one of the nation’s most reputable fine art reproduction companies, specializing in archival digital printing on canvas and fine art papers, using archival inks.

 

 

Running from it 46cm x 46cmA RESTLESS MIND:
A “Group Show” by D. Laurent Dahlke

Exhibited March 6th through April 1, 2014

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“If we are willing to accept a new mystery that provokes our thought process, then this confusion is only an interpretation that we are trying to understand.” – Don Dahlke

The tenacious and talented Don Dahlke, considered one of the most forward thinking painters and sculptors of our time, is the solo artist for Pearl Gallery & Framing’s March exhibition. Although our show will display the work of only a single artist, the content ranges widely, from Dahlke’s exacting and disciplined figurative style to his surrealistic work and to his abstract and playful pieces. His work is conceptually significant in its dissection of the psyche as representational art: deconstructionist, poignant, multidimensional and mature.

A truly rare jewel in the art world with a resume of exhibits spanning many decades and countries, he is one of the most diverse artists of the 20th and 21st century. Born Donald Laurent Dahlke in 1950, San Francisco to a merchant and housewife, Dahlke was often told that art was not a viable means of supporting oneself, yet at an early age Dahlke developed a zeal for the arts that never faltered. His grandfather, a stuntman, props man and back drop painter in Hollywood in the 1920s played influenced his interest in art, as did Richard Muller of Portland State University. Although he was tagged by many teachers as a bad student and regularly reprimanded for drawing in class, he was always a determined and rebellious thinker, and this tenacity has helped him become an internationally acclaimed and renowned artist.

Dahlke is one of the innovators of the agglomerate style of painting. He is a sculptor, printmaker, ceramist and designer who has exhibited his work nationally and internationally and lived abroad in numerous locales, such as England, Greece, St. Christopher, the U.S. Virgin Islands and Mexico. He has devoted 53 years to the creation of art. Whether accepted by critics and curators or not, he has continued to overcome rejection. His restless mind and progressive thinking still leads him to an innovative process that changes the way art is created and perceived.

IMG_0735_RConcepts of this Exhibition:

Characters of Multitude: Pen, Ink and Pencil drawings

With the multitude of choices that are presented to us daily, and the chaotic pace we experience, it is hard to feel singular and focused on who we are. This work is an interpretation of how modern society makes us feel.
“A non-assertive and spontaneous approach to our lives in today’s society”

Abstract Entities: Mixed Media agglomerate painting

This work confronts the diversity we experience within in our everyday lives. We have ideas of what we understand and can relate to, but we are constantly confronted with Ideas and ideologies that challenge us – ideas in conflict with our interpretation of what is acceptable to us and what is not.
“A multiplicity of thought processes to represent a singular entity”

 

 

Pearl District Bunny Hop Saturday April 19, 2014
Craft Project: noon – 3:00 pm

It’s the annual Bunny Hop, a free family event. Everyone is welcome – kids especially! Hop by Pearl Gallery & Framing for special TREATS, adorn your outfit with a crafty BUNNY MASK, take home your own hand-colored BUNNY FINGER PUPPET or BUNNY CARD for your family.

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Store-to-Store Easter Egg Hunt – Noon to 3:00pm

Bring the whole family, collect treats, do art projects, and search for this year’s “signature” Easter Egg cut-out that is creatively hidden in participating merchants’ windows or shops. Collect stamps to complete your map, vote for the best window displays, get “bounce back” offers for special deals in the future, and be entered to win raffle prizes.

Live Music, Treats and Raffle Winners – 2:30pm

Hop to Jamison Square to learn the raffle winners and listen to live music sponsored by We Village, featuring Jenna Ellefson and Amanda Breese – original Americana string music.

 

Toys & Tales: Acrylic Paintings & Fine Art Dolls

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Exhibited February 6 through March 4, 2014
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“I have always been a maker, artist, and creator for as long as I can remember.” – Amanda Sue Myers

For February, Pearl Gallery & Framing welcomes the talented Amanda Sue Myers.

Previously a tattoo artist and still the owner of Infinity Tattoo, one of the Northwest’s premier studios, Myers brings lifetimes of visual design experience to her flawlessly executed works. Myers creates fine art dolls and paintings inspired by nature, mythology, historical and cultural costumes, and beautiful strange places seen during her travels. She has a BFA in costume design from the California Institute of Arts, and applied her skills for several years working in Oregon and Alaska repertory theaters before moving to Portland. Her work has been shown in the greater Portland area in small cafés, breweries, and several local Galleries.

Myers Describes Her Doll Creation Process:

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“My dolls are made with a structured wire armature, padded and covered in soft fabric, making them not only sturdy, but nice to hold. I incorporate polymer and paper clay, natural and synthetic fibers, and my old crochet hook to fabricate every tiny detail. All of the large wood panel paintings are made with acrylic paint and markers.”

For 2014, her new dolls are made in the same general technique, but this year’s dolls are a bit smaller.

 All dolls are gently bendable and can be posed or placed in a stand.

 

Nostalgia: Original & Reproduction Prints

DEFINITION of Nostalgia: 1. the state of being homesick: homesickness; 2. a wistful or excessively sentimental yearning for return to or of some past period or irrecoverable condition;

First Known Use: 1729

Exhibited December 2013

See our selection of genuine antique prints and maps, along with our fine art giclee reproductions. This show will feature one image to give a sneak peek of the April 2014 show featuring artists Tekoah Buchanan and Brian Carter.  Tekoah Buchanan has taken the photographs of Portland imagery and Brian Carter has used his layering technique to achieve a new, yet nostalgic representation of Portland in today’s times. We will also be showing our newest selection of genuine antique prints and maps along with our fine art reproductions. If you missed any of our shows from 2013, you can catch some selected originals from our featured artists of 2013.  We will have a few hand selected pieces from these artists. (In partnership with Pearl Printing.)

 

35 x 35 x 35:

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35 photographs over 35 years from 35mm film
by Allan Bruce Zee

Exhibited November 2013

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Allan Bruce Zee’s color photographs interpret nature’s landscape and man’s imprint upon it. His photography has been exhibited in galleries, one-person and group shows in 14 cities nationwide. His prints are included in numerous private, public and corporate art collections throughout the United States, including IBM, AT&T, Merrill Lynch, Sloan Kettering Hospitals, American Express Corporation, World Bank and Johns Hopkins Medical Center, as well as in Ansel Adams’ collection. In addition, his photographs reside in collections in Japan, France, Italy, Mexico, Canada, Australia and Argentina. Allan Bruce Zee has been exploring the art of photography since 1969. Now living in Port Townsend, Washington, Allan maintains a studio in Portland, Oregon, his home for 30 years. Allan was born in Chicago, Illinois, where his first artwork was exhibited at the age of 12 at the Art Institute of Chicago.

PEARL FOR THE PEARL
Two Artists: Two Shows: One Cause

Acrylic & Mixed Media by Jeanie Smith and Fine Art Photography by Ron Wolf

25% of Proceeds donated to the Zimmerman Community Center’s art program for under-served children and elders living in the Pearl District.

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Exhibited October 2013
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Reception Locations:
Pearl Gallery & Framing
1017 NW Davis
The Geezer Gallery
600 NW Naito Pkwy, Ste. E

About the Artists:
Jeanie Smith
has been involved with art all of her life. She began drawing and painting at the age of five, encouraged by her family of artists. Known as a colorist, she paints contemporary abstract, blending the mystery of shape and form to create emerging depth to each creation. Her sense of humor is often found in some painting detail and/or title, should the observer choose to participate. Featured in solo exhibits and group shows in Oregon and California, Smith was presented with the Partricia Burman “Most Original Painting Award” at the Palm Springs Art Museum in 2004. She has been awarded several Best of Show recognitions at Art Festivals and continues to show her art in Oregon. She has gained insight from the work of artists such as Joan Miro, Hans Hoffman, Hans (Jean) Arp, Wassily Kandinsky, and Josep Albers. Her travels to France, Italy, Greece, Turkey, Spain, Portugal, Belize, Mexico and the Caribbean have expanded her art appreciation and have provided depth to her understanding of art history. An artist and poet, Smith resides in Warm Springs and Portland, Oregon with her husband, Ken Smith and their silky terrier, Benni.

Ron Wolf first encountered photography in a 1954 Oregon City Junior High photography class. With his parent’s gift of a Kodak film processing kit, he began making 2″ by 2″ black and white prints of his photos. His unique composition style provoked a classmate to mockingly ask, “Are you trying to look like a professional?” Ironically, the adolescent criticism wasn’t the only negative message Ron received regarding his artistic bent. Despite the gift of the camera kit, family support for young Ron’s pursuit of photography as a career was decidedly lacking. Family emphasis on “doing good” that was helpful to others overrode Ron’s enthusiasm for a vocation deemed impractical for supporting a family and of little value as anything more than a hobby. Ron stored the miniature black and white prints in an old cigar box, but never discarded them. Ron spent decades serving others, first as a public school teacher, then as a credentialed counselor and later as a business owner. Photography was a hobby to record family history. Over the years he gradually came to the realization that art does help people. Ron believes there are three things in this world that people need: Truth, Goodness, and Beauty. Art is beauty, and “without beauty your life shrinks.” This profound truth empowered Ron to begin pursuing photography as an art form. In 1999, Ron discovered his black and white prints…left years ago in that old cigar box. Finding the tiny prints re-ignited his passion his passion for photography. He purchased a high quality digital camera and the fun began. Ron’s intuitive, natural talent enables him to capture the beauty wherever he goes – be it Italy, France, Russia, Mexico, or the western United States. A keen eye for architectural detail is reflected in many of Ron’s works. Images of window frames, doorways, and even door knockers evoke cultural nuance, paying homage to the artistic creations of gifted craftsmen and inviting the contemporary viewer to appreciate the ordinary artifacts of daily life. Light, color, and texture come alive through Ron’s unique perspective, transforming the mundane into magnificent works of art. Today, at 70, Ron feels a sense of liberation from the oppressing messages of his youth. He chooses to follow his artistic pursuits; finding it brings an “aliveness” to his life like nothing else. Ron’s hope is that older adults who are newly discovering (or rediscovering) their artistic abilities will be afforded the opportunity to show their creative work alongside seasoned professional artists. He believes that when society sees older adults producing quality, marketable works of art, it will lead to a revolutionary change in the way we all see our elder population. Ron has received the Ron Cohen Award from the Statesman Journal and the Aurora Colony Days People’s Choice Award.

Geezer Gallery is a unique nonprofit art gallery devoted to investment quality, master-level, senior artists 60 years and older.

Zimmerman Community Center improves the quality of life in Portland, Oregon by offering fun, affordable activities and space in an inviting environment for all. They offer programs that are financially accessible to a broad spectrum of people living/ working in the central city.

 

BRIDGES

I-5 BridgePaintings and Prints by Christopher Mooney

September 5th – October 1, 2013
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Astoria, Ross Island and San Diego have something in common! They have been represented by our local bridge-painter whose stunning paintings will be displayed at Pearl Gallery & Framing in the show, BRIDGES, an exhibition of the work of Christopher Mooney. A local celebrity in architectural painting, Mooney has made substantial contributions to the visual documentation of urban landmarks in Portland. As a painter of Oregon’s transportation architecture, Mooney reveals Portland as a city of rivers and bridges, showcasing the character, function and form of these icons. He is fascinated by the way in which geometric shapes of steel girders frame the landscape of the city.

People cross bridges every day. See BRIDGES, and with each new crossing, you will celebrate the powerful engineering achievements these feats of architecture represent. The bridges of Portland improve commerce, connect communities, and unite the city. Mooney honors bridges by painting them from unusual points of view, giving them dramatic perspectives, rendering them both realistic and abstract. Light plays an important role in his paintings, illuminating structures, casting shadows, and encouraging viewers to see bridges in new ways, directing our attention to details that we might not otherwise observe.

Mooney has a BFA in illustration from Parson’s School of Design, New York, New York. His work has been the subject of numerous group and solo exhibitions. He is a member of Portland Open Studios and has won several awards for his painting. His work, cityscape was used as the cover and poster publicizing the book, Rental Sales Gallery, Portland Art Museum, The First 50 Years, in 2009. His work has been featured in Hawthorne Bridge, Celebrating 100 Years in Art and Words, a 2010 calendar supporting the Hawthorne Bridge Centennial Celebration. He continues to gain notoriety for his paintings.We are proud to feature this local artist; BRIDGES will surely transport you!

 

UPON REFLECTION

Monochromatic Oil Paintings and Charcoal Drawings
by Gillian Freney

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August 1 – September 3, 2013
The bark on a street tree. An abandoned bird’s nest. The river viewed from a bridge. They’re common sights of a busy daily life in Portland. But upon reflection, any of these common sights has a complexity and elegance all its own. Noticing their patterns, shadows, and layers is a form of appreciation. Drawing and painting them is simply an effort to share that appreciation.UPON REFLECTION is an exhibit of oil paintings and charcoal drawings that focuses on the order we find in nature, for example: the elegant feats of diligence we observe in nest-making or the regular patterns of birch bark.
From the Artist:
I grew up believing I couldn’t draw. It was true. I couldn’t draw …  because I never tried for longer than the ten seconds or so it took to hit a snag. Patience was not my strong suit, and drawing did not come easy. I’m still impatient, and drawing still comes hard, but somewhere along the line, I warmed to the snags. In fact, the snags became compelling. Once I took the time to get to know them, the snags became friends and teachers. I took up painting in earnest a couple years ago, relatively late in life. Between the demands of family and work, I never found time for classes. I’ve been accepted into two juried shows. I’ve sold paintings to individuals, and I’ve done commissions. I’m late-blooming and self-taught. I took up drawing in hopes that a better grasp of value might help me find the right colors as I painted. It started as a means to an end, but it became an end in itself. Lately I’ve extended the exploration of value to monochrome paintings. I go back and forth between drawing and painting. Each informs the other. I never feel like I know what I’m doing, and I hope I never will. I’m especially attracted to trees, nests, and reflections in water. They all have a sort of internal order that speaks to me. I appreciate the ways that trees embody the shapes of their mishaps (their bug bites, their broken branches). I love how water reflects its wobbly version of the solid world. Taking the time to look closely at these things is rewarding beyond measure. I think of each drawing or painting as an exercise in appreciation.
Materials: I started out working with sticks of compressed charcoal on paper. I like how dark it goes on, and I like the look when it’s erased. Eventually I added charcoal pencils, and also vine charcoal, in search of different effects. I smear and erase a lot. As for frosted Mylar, I tried drawing on it because I liked the glowy, smeary quality of charcoal-on-Mylar drawings. Painting on Mylar came about by accident, when I wiped a brush on a scrap of Mylar, then realized how easily and cleanly the wet oil paint comes off. I experimented with various methods of applying and removing the paint, and liked the results.

CONVERSATIONS

Abstract Paintings by Kelly Williams

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July 3 – July 30, 2013

CONVERSATIONS is an exhibit of abstract encaustic paintings, created with pigment and wax, exploring hidden meanings in the tradition of palimpsest.  A palimpsest is a manuscript page from which the text has been scraped or washed off to be used again. Romans wrote on wax-coated tablets that could be smoothed and reused, and the term palimpsest was used in the time of Cicero to refer to this practice. This series of encaustic works by Kelly Williams explores the idea of palimpsest. She represents powerful dialogues — CONVERSATIONS –  through visually complex paintings with deep layers of meaning. Palimpsest is about what is hidden.  Historically, it refers to the act of obscuring or scraping clean old text and overlaying it with new writing, leaving prior writing visible, but indecipherable. As with her previous series, Internal Landscapes, honoring the spirit and artistic depth of Mark Rothko, she continues to express the divergence between internal and external forces. Rothko had an invaluable ability to capture raw, emotional experience by using only washes of color. He is a source of inspiration for Kelly Williams. The layering process inherent to encaustic painting symbolizes the passage of time and the build-up of experiences, one covering another, blending and altering the final visible perception. The use of fire and heat in the creation process reveals deeply buried layers. Layers are also visible through the gouging, scraping, and marking of the wax. The end result is a complicated, intense tactile work. We invite you to gently touch the art, feeling both the subtle smoothness and rough qualities.
Kelly Williams is a Portland icon in the world of encaustic painting. Williams has shown extensively both locally and nationally. She is a philanthropist, a community-involved artist generously giving her time and skills to serve recovery programs, arts education and collaborative art collectives. Williams developed a Regional Arts and Culture Council-funded project entitled Recovery Panes, working with those affected by addiction. Her work is included in the collections of several local businesses, and has been featured in many local and national publications.
From the Artist: A symbolic narrative often weaves a course through my work, a progression of disentanglement, a developing story, layer by layer. Only upon close examination does one experience the intimate textures, subtle imagery, and imperfections that make up the whole. Secrets found within the layers add meaning to the final painting. The process of encaustic painting allows for this metaphoric layering, burning, burying, and exposing the imagery of my work. This ancient medium being used for contemporary expression further supports the timeless messages and questions that I seek to explore. As I paint, my mind wrestles with thoughts, ideas and feelings that are fragmented and unclear. I capture these fragments, write them out, only allowing them to exist for a brief moment of exposure before I take the torch to them and obscure them. Ideas are rendered openly and then returned to the abstract as unreadable and unknowable fragments, in the way that conversations are fleeting representations of our existence. I can protect the unspeakable while paradoxically giving it form, expressing the articulated thought through spontaneous writing between the layers of paint.
About Kelly’s Encaustic Painting Process:
Williams works in the medium of encaustic paint. Encaustic painting is an ancient medium dating back to early Greek and Egyptian art. The paint is made from melted beeswax mixed with pigment and resin. Each layer is fused with a heat implement such as a torch or iron before new layers can be added. Carving tools are used to incise lines and shapes and add sculptural elements, bringing the painted surface beyond its traditional two-dimensions.

 

Impressionism in Wax by Janet Amundson-Splidsboel

Breezy_Encaustic_PaintingJune 6 -  July 2, 2013

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Special Thanks:  Singer and song writer Dave Hu, who played at the First Thursday reception

The work of Janet Amundson-Splidsboel is simply captivating. She is a widely known local encaustic impressionist painter who creates mostly figurative, but also landscape and still life artwork.

Amundson-Splidsboel dreamt of becoming an artist as a young girl, and now her dream is reality. Her paintings have been featured in newspapers, such as  the Hollywood Star and Lake Oswego Review, on the cover of the Portland Fine Arts Guild brochure, and in the forthcoming book, Embracing Encaustic by Linda Womack. Her paintings can even be seen on the walls of the 2013 Portlandia TV series. Amundson-Splidsboel has exhibited her work in numerous Portland galleries, theatres, public buildings, fundraising events and designer showcases. She is a juried member of the Oregon Society of Artists and Watercolor Society of Oregon. Her work has gained entry to many juried shows and invitation-only events. Pearl Gallery & Framing is pleased to showcase her latest encaustic paintings in June 2013!

Amundson-Splidsboel donates a sizable portion of her proceeds to causes such as horse rescue and groups working to rescue animals destined to be euthanized in our public animal shelters.

About Janet’s Encaustic Painting Process:
Beeswax and damar resin are melted and dry pigment is added for color. The tins of molten wax and colored pigment are kept in a molten state on a heated griddle. Bristle brushes are dipped into the molten wax and quickly used to paint upon the painting surface, which is usually a board such as untempered masonite, wood, or some form of art panel. Each time wax is added to the painting it must be fused into the previous layer of wax by torch. Various scrapers are used to scrape off unwanted areas of wax as the work progresses. This process is repeated many times. There are usually 20 or more layers of wax in a completed piece.

Sine Morse: Immersed in Nature: Journeys in Paper

oceanreefMay 2 – June 4, 2013

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Featured Artist in our Upstairs Gallery

Sine Morse is a paper artist extraordinaire, and this is her first solo show. She will be featuring her larger pieces, never before displayed or shown. Her work has been exhibited in New York, San Francisco, Seattle and throughout Oregon.  She paints thick watercolor paper with acrylics to create vibrant colors, and then cuts each detail of her composition by hand, drawing from her imagination to create paper shadow box scenes. To give dimension and depth, Morse layers vivid colors of paper and rolls paper into cylinders. Her work is enchanting and whimsical, and her brightly colored unique creations depict a natural world that pops with life. See images on Facebook.

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Shane Koehler: Abyss

Guest Artist in our Downstairs Gallery
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Abyss showcases marine wildlife with emphasis on deep sea creatures and their interactions. Koehler takes a mixed media approach and uses watercolor and acrylic paints. He is an emerging artist whose work has been shown locally only one time before. We are excited to host this exhibit of nature-inspired work.

 

 

SOLO EXHIBITION OF LARGE-SCALE PHOTOGRAPHIC IMAGES

industek_visions_3_Sliderby Tekoah Buchanan
April 4 – April 30, 2013

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More About this Artist (Prints Available)

April 2013 is Portland Photo Month!  Join us in celebrating the art, history and practice of photography during Portland’s city-wide focus on photography. Pearl Gallery & Framing is excited to feature local artist Tekoah Buchanan’s stunning large-scale photographic images of ships and waterways. The exhibit focuses on ships and waterways with an up close and personal perspective. Tekoah Buchanan shares images that reveal his lifelong quest to translate our fast-paced industrial world into pictorial works, revealing the beauty of our everyday world.  Buchanan’s photographic images have a hand-colored look, and they are printed large-scale by Pearl Printing on fine art photo paper, canvas and satin cloth. Tekoah Buchanan, a graduate of University of Oregon’s Electronic Media Production program, is obsessed with photography. His photographic eye is constantly trained on the world around him; he is a natural at capturing city scenes. He has spent countless hours in the darkroom, experimented with emulsion techniques, and worked on video production. Buchanan’s roots are in film and video, having mixed Super 8 Film shorts with video footage in his college days. He became intrigued with the idea of stopping film, and he began to create several series of still image photos from the footage that would typically be seen only as moving pictures. He named his process of transforming moving images to still shots “industek visions ?” to brand his process, his style and his imagery. It is a combination of “industrial” and “Tekoah,” his unusual first name, meaning sound of the trumpet. The question mark represents our shared humanity, our attempts to understand the world around us, the way that we use our analytical minds to perceive, but our emotional bewilderment at the grandeur of life with a future unknown.  “industek visions ?” represents an open-eyed look at reality that encompasses infinite possibilities. We welcome photography-lovers to see this well-respected artist’s industek vision.

 

VUE MONDIALE: FRAGMENTS AND MEMORIES

Paris_&_More_Paris_SMAn Exhibit of Mixed Media Collage by J. S. Salter
March 7 – April 2, 2013
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Artist J. S. Salter is an international artist who has shown her work extensively since the early 1990s, having participated in two dozen expositions all over the world, with popularity in Canada. She creates mixed media collage focusing on regional culture. A sampling of her work represents majestic Greek statues and simple found objects. J. S. Salter was born in Nova Scotia and received her artistic education in Boston, and also France, and she graduated from Montreal’s John Abbot College. We are pleased to exhibit this internationally acclaimed artist.

From the artist, J. S. Salter:  I began my first collage about 18 years ago, after a visit to New York City with my college group. However, I only returned to this medium a few years ago, as a change from ‘just painting.’ Drawings are the mainstay of my collage. In the 1980′s before picking up a brush, I drew every day for three years, so am not short of material. Although just as challenging as painting, the search for appropriate and authentic material lends interest to this collage process. I paint from my ‘mind’s eye’; this approach is most difficult but gives me a feeling of accomplishment. About the title piece, Paris and More Paris, I have tried to show a little of this city through the ages. The streets on the map brought to mind the heroes and the not so heroic whose names grace the city.

 

 

pdba_bunny_hop_300x250Pearl District Annual Bunny Hop

March 30, 2013 Noon – 3:00 p.m.

It’s the annual Bunny Hop, a free family event. Everyone is welcome – kids especially!  Hop by Pearl Gallery & Framing for special TREATS, adorn your outfit with a BUNNY MASK or color a BUNNY CARD.

 

A D R I F T: An Exhibit of Screen Prints

by Travis Taylor
Feb. 7 – March 5, 2013

screen print

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Artist Travis Taylor was born in Santa Barbara, California, in 1980 after which he spent the first ten years of his life moving from place to place and living in remote settings with no electricity or running water. After a turbulent and unproductive 2 ½ years of high school, Taylor dropped out (with a G.E.D.) and began pursuing a B.F.A. degree which was completed at the University of Montana in 2003.

Taylor often shifts between a variety of media including painting, sculpture, photography, screen printing and music. In his ongoing music project Convenient Noise, he uses synthesizers and samplers to produce strange and barren musical backdrops which are accompanied by live lyrics and spoken word. Taylor looks for inspiration in many places but especially in the grey areas of his own mind. By allowing the subconscious to play a strong role in the process of his art, his work becomes an avenue for expression and exploration.

The surreal subject matter of these small hand pulled silk-screen pieces is an attempt to look beyond the everyday world and give physical presence to subconscious thoughts in hope of re-examining our own inner workings. Taylor feels that visual art can be a gateway to the self and a connection to one another that transcends written words or language. It can change and grow through the power of interpretation long after the work is completed. As an artist, he feels a responsibility to keep searching and exploring regardless of medium.

 

BLOOM: AN EXHIBITION OF BOTANICAL ETCHINGS

Botanical Print

January 2013 Curated Installation

U.S. Bank, NW 23rd & Lovejoy, Portland OR

Artist Statement by Sandra Carlson
Drawing the perfect flower has been a preoccupation of mine ever since I started making art as a child in my hometown of Phoenix, Arizona.  Shy and introspective, I found a refuge in my obsession with the micro-world of desert plants, reptiles and insects. It is this world of serpents and beastly vegetation that I respond to in my work even now.  Since I have a natural inclination to draw, etching provides an excellent vehicle to explore my personal expression and aesthetic.  My artwork is influenced by illustrations of early botany, memory, imagination and invention. An emphasis is placed on representing these imagined “rarities” of nature as portraits of “hybrids.” I will often compare and contrast the fundamental similarities of structures in human anatomy to organisms in vegetation and in that way, blur the boundaries of organic hierarchy in an attempt to add humor to my imagery in a distinctively personal way.  Line etching allows me to spontaneously create inspired gestures of mark making that resembles the methodical labor-intensive qualities of engraving in a fraction of the time. A variety of grays are achieved with the use of Aquatint.  A second printmaking technique I have explored in this series is Chine-collé. Rice paper is cut into shapes and collaged onto the print, adding texture and color.  Most of my work is printed on Murillo printmaking paper.  It is excellent for picking up the plate tone I want, and imitates the aged look of old botanical illustrations. The largest piece in this show is printed on Arches printmaking paper.  Chine-collé is added for color accents at the root ball and the flower head.  These abstract graphic representations emphasize my view of the fantastic, ethereal, and other worldly qualities that I still find in nature.

 

 

Collage of Represented Artists

Nostalgia: An Art Retrospective

Celebrating the year’s artists!

December 2012 – January 2013

Original Art • Hand Blown Glass Ornaments • Silk Scarves • Ceramics • Jewelry • Soy Candles

 

 

 


 

Burnside

PORTLAND

An Exhibit of Paintings and Wire Sculpture

by Zak Gere

Nov.1 - Dec. 4, 2012
(upstairs gallery)

 

PORTLAND, features Zak Gere’s photo-realistic large-scale paintings of our great city.  alongside his amazing wire sculpture.  Native-Portlander and self-taught artist, Gere has been independently showing and selling art since 1999. Gere’s paintings vary greatly in subject and style from photo-realistic portraits to highly stylized figures and landscapes. Zak also produces wire sculpture which he builds from steel into incredibly detailed solid forms.  Interviewed by Urban Art Network, an organization dedicated to creating a thriving arts culture for independent artists, Gere described his artistic journey’s beginning.  He was eight years old, and he perfected the Tippy the turtle drawing, the “famous reptile in cap and turtleneck that graced so many magazine and matchbook ads for art school.”  From his early recognition that he could be an artist, his work shifted from inventing comic book characters, drawing mountains, and depicting women in reading chairs.

Gere had some formal training at Clackamas Community College, where he was first introduced to painting.  It was there that he learned he didn’t need to be schooled in art to pursue his dream, and he is now successful through his sometimes monk-like commitment to his work.  He was inspired to sculpt with wire in his early youth, as a freshman in high school.  He makes animals from wire using basic tools: a hammer, pliers, and his own muscles.

 

Circus of Wonders

In Our Imagination:

An Exhibit of Acrylic Paintings

by Devin Bernard

Nov. 1 - Dec. 4, 2012
(downstairs gallery)

Sponsored in part by Geezer Gallery, In Our Imagination is a show about ideas and possibilities. It is a collection of images that we would be lucky to see in our dreams. Bernard’s work is mystical, archetypal and dreamlike with its daring depictions of stories unfolding. His work combines portraiture and landscape styles common to Renaissance painting, but also shows influences of the Mogul paintings from India and Latin American painting styles. His work is highly detailed, with striking colors and images that resonate. Bernard’s acrylic paintings are revelatory in the way that they draw us toward an idea, concept or story, and yet leave us with a sense of mystery, full of wonder. Devin Bernard holds a BA in Art Education. His preferred medium is acrylic paint on board or canvas. His work has been shown at several well-known Portland galleries, including the Geezer Gallery.

About Geezer Gallery 
Our featured artist is represented by our new neighbor, recently relocated Geezer Gallery. The Geezer Gallery is devoted to investment quality, master-level senior artists, dedicated to featuring world class works by artists age 60 and older. A nonprofit 501c3, proceeds help fund art as therapy and creativity programs to enable seniors’ brain cell growth, dexterity and self-expression.
New Location: 600 NW Naito Pkwy #E, Portland Or 97209


Figurative Sculpture Group Photo by KenworthHABITS AND HUMOR

 An Exhibit of Figurative Sculpture
and Velvet Paintings

by Jennifer Kenworth

Oct. 4 - 30, 2012

Whose work has been featured in HBO’s series, True Blood, is held in the private collection of Danielle Steel and appears on Nike sportswear? None other than Jennifer Kenworth, also known by her pseudonym, Juanita. Kenworth is the famed painter of fuzzy fabric and sculptor of caricatures from six inches to seven feet tall! Pearl Gallery & Framing is excited to host Habits and Humor, a solo exhibit of figurative sculpture and velvet paintings by local artistic celebrity, Jennifer Kenworth.

Velvet Skull Painting

Kenworth began painting when she was five years old, and was formally educated in ceramic sculpture at California College of the Arts. After showing and selling her ceramic sculptures for many years in the Bay Area and Portland, she discovered velvet painting. She continues creating life-sized figurative sculptures and paints regularly on velvet. Her artwork has been shown all along the west coast including Los Angeles and Seattle.

Kenworth captures the humor of everyday ordinary life in her figurative ceramic sculpture, and represents pop culture in her velvet paintings. Her work has been nationally recognized in well-known venues including the Tonight Show and Oregon Art Beat. You can see her work in the book, Black Velvet Masterpieces: Highlights from the Collection of the Velveteria Museum. She’s been featured in Entrepreneur Magazine and National Geographic Traveler Magazine, and she has served as a visiting artist for Oregon College of Art and Craft and Lewis and Clark College.

In her own words:  The figurative sculptures I create are snapshots of people I see around me in my daily routine. It’s fascinating to me how people present themselves to the world while moving through their daily lives. Someone waiting at a bus stop or in line at a store could inspire me simply by the color of the clothes they are wearing or by the way they are standing. It is these ordinary things in life that catch my eye and inspire me. As Juanita, I capture humor in life through kitsch and icons of American pop culture.

 

Peter Iredale 1 - shipwreck painting by Shanon Playford

With Emerging Artist Sheri McGrath

Sept. 6 – Oct. 2, 2012

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Pearl Gallery & Framing is proud to exhibit the work of the amazing Shanon Playford. Owing to an interest in art history and contemporary culture, Shanon Playford is something of a painting chameleon. She allows her ideas (or subjects) to dictate the style and approach taken for each new series. Her work demonstrates an unstoppable curiosity for the “what if.” Embracing inconsistency as her signature style, she identifies herself as a project/theme-oriented artist. Shanon Playford works primarily in oil. She infuses her work with a keen knowledge of – and playful irreverence to – traditional skills and techniques.

Having decided she wanted to be an artist in kindergarten, she has been steadily painting & drawing ever since. Shanon Playford graduated from The School of the Art Institute of Chicago in 1997 and studied at the School of the Museum Fine Arts in Boston. She lives and paints in her native Portland, Oregon. Her work has been showcased in the United Kingdom and galleries throughout the United States.  Her collectors will be thrilled to see Shanon Playford’s nostalgic paintings on paper, panel and canvas.  This exhibit is not to be missed!

Special thanks to musical group, D.N.A. for providing live sitar sounds at the art opening.

Swing Me to the Song of Mockery - Mixed Media by Sheri McGrath

In our downstairs gallery, we are featuring Sheri McGrath, emerging artist from Bandon, Oregon.  Pearl Gallery & Framing is exited to showcase McGrath’s latest mixed media series of work entitled, Swing Me to the Song of Mockery.  Although her current series includes images of mocking birds, each piece includes some other aspect of irony or mockery.  For example, embedded in one of her original collages, you can find a locking box and key designed for special documents, such as a diploma that one might normally see framed to highlight an achievement, but instead it can be safely and secretly stored within the artwork.  Mcgrath is a self taught artist who uses recycled materials to create ironic folk art.  Her work has been exhibited at several Oregon coastal galleries, including Whistling Gallery, SAGE Gallery, Second Street Gallery and Cest Vert, in eastern Oregon at Easy Frame Art Gallery and Sozo, and at The Nickel in Port Orford and Sharkbites in Coos Bay.

 

 

 

Painting by Jodi Burton

A    B R E A T H    O F    I M P R E S S I O N I S M

F E A T U R E D   A R T I S T   J O D I   B U R T O N

guest artist Tina Gleave

August 2 – September 4, 2012

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Pearl Gallery & Framing is pleased to host A Breath of Impressionism, an exhibition of En Plein Air and Still Life Paintings by Jodi Burton, with Silk Wall Hangings and Scarves by guest artist Tina Gleave.

Jodi Burton, in the tradition of the French impressionists, paints “en plein air,” meaning in open air. Artists have long painted outdoors, but this style of painting flourished in the late 1800s when toothpaste-like tubes of paint became available, and French painters like Claude Monet began recording their impressions of the landscapes. In addition to some studio painting of still life, she paints landscapes outdoors in the daylight, rendering breathtaking images filled with the quality of natural light. Although her paintings can be compared to French impressionists, Burton is wary of how style can be limiting, and also of realistic rendering. She doesn’t try to paint photographically. She prefers to push herself in a disciplined way, not just telling the story as she sees it, but including the other or the unknown, discovering and representing something new about each landscape. Jodi Burton is a member of the Portland Plein Air and Studio Painters.

Fun fact: Jodi Burton was commissioned to paint Oregon scenes on the 1921 CW Parker carousel at Jantzen Beach.

Pearl Gallery & Framing is proud to showcase the WEARABLE fine art and wall hangings of California textile artist, Tina Gleave, whose hand painted silk scarves and wall hangings make excellent gifts. Her vivid and vibrant patterns are reminiscent of stained-glass or impressionist paintings. Her style reminds us of the ethereal and dreamy bliss of our natural world, its changing seasons and brilliant gardens. Subjects include irises, sunflowers, orchids, calla lilies, hydrangeas, poppies, Birds of Paradise, dogwoods, aspens, monarch butterflies and more. Gleave is a member of Silk Painters International.

First Thursday, August 2, 2012, we supported the Oregon Women’s Sailing Association’s first annual fundraising event, Sailing through the Pearl, as one of a limited number of galleries that hosted the organization’s Word Puzzle Scavenger Hunt.  Organized in 1994 by the efforts and enthusiasm of local women sailors, the not-for-profit OWSA exists to promote and facilitate the participation of women in sailboat cruising and/or racing events in Oregon and Southwest Washington.

 

C H R O M A T I C   M I X T U R E S  2

WILLIAM HERNANDEZ
Solo exhibit

July 5 – July 31, 2012

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Pearl Gallery & Framing is pleased to host CHROMATIC MIXTURES 2, an exhibit of acrylic paintings by Portland-based Peruvian artist, William Hernandez. Here is your chance to meet the artist, William Hernandez, whose artworks are in private collections in Spain, Lima, Germany, Guatemala, Chile and of course, the United States. His style is breathtaking; this is a “must see” show for collectors, especially those who love Peruvian art and culture.

This new series, CHROMATIC MIXTURES 2, focuses on color-rich urban life. Through his use of color, Hernandez alludes to his experiences as a Peruvian artist in Portland, depicting a diverse world of relationships, both imaginary and representational. William Hernandez offers to us in this current series his magical color palette, the hues and tones of real life. Hernandez has the ability to capture dreamlike qualities in his visionary figurative painting. His pieces are sometimes surreal and always playful.

William Hernandez trained at Lima’s Escuela Nacional de Bellas Artes (1995-2002), and moved to Portland in 2009. He creates both figurative and abstract paintings with his distinct vision, incorporating intense colors, warm figures and humor. In January 2010, Hernandez showed a new body of work consisting of influential figurative paintings entitled “Chromatic Mixtures.” The current exhibit draws on themes from that show, telling stories about and through color.

The work of William Hernandez has been exhibited in galleries and cultural centers from Lima to Portland, including Instituto Cultural Peruano Norteamericano, Centro Cultural de Espana, and several venues around Portland. In 2007 and 2008, he participated in the U.S. Embassy’s Noche de Arte: the largest art exhibition in Peru, a show that generates funds for the United States Agency for International Development (USAID). In 2011, his work was exhibited throughout La Luna Nueva festival, a Portland event sponsored by PGE Foundation, The Oregonian, and supported in part by a grant from the Oregon Arts Commission and the National Endowment for the Arts. His work has been covered by numerous publications, including Diario EL Comercio (Peru), and many more journals and blogs.

Aside from painting, Hernandez worked as a graphic designer for both public and international institutions in Lima and worked as an art teacher for El Museo de Arte. Since moving to Portland, Hernandez has shown art at many cafes, stores and galleries throughout Portland. He was one of the organizers for the first Intercambio de Artistas Latinos (Latin American Artists Exchange), which aims to create a network of artists in the Northwest to share ideas, expression and art.

If you can’t make it to the Art Opening, First Thursday, July 5, 2012, be sure to stop by anytime in July to see this exhibit.


 

Flaming Guitar  Waterfront Blues Festival 2011  by Gary HoustonGARY HOUSTON SHOWS US THE BLUES:
AN EXHIBIT OF LIMITED EDITION HAND-PULLED PRINTS

an installation for:
PORTLAND CENTER STAGE GALLERY LEVEL

April 13 – July 13, 2012

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In honor of It Ain’t Nothin’ but the Blues, we are curating an exhibit at the Portland Center Stage Gallery, featuring the work of master Graphic Designer, Illustrator and Screen Printer, Gary Houston, whose commitment to portray musical artists is nothing short of amazing.  He captures his subjects, especially blues artists and events, in a way that is “gravelly and gritty,” yet comedic, all the while “full of salvation, uplifting” (in his own words).  He is an artistic genius who is pleased to work as a traditional screen printer in the vein of the medium as it was invented by the Chinese over 2000 years ago.  He has been creating posters for Portland’s Waterfront Blues Festival, whose mission is to raise funds to benefit Oregon Food Bank, since 2001, and many have turned into collector’s items.  Picasso’s “Old Guitarist” (1903) with the bony fingers and the deep blue oil paint, inspired one of the blues posters featured in this exhibit, “Man Plays Guitar,” from Waterfront Blues Festival 2006.  Other images featured in Gary Houston’s work include flaming guitars, bridges and bicycles.

Gary Houston is one of the great American poster artists. Under the name Voodoo Catbox, he is best known for making silk-screen posters for music concerts, particularly for local venues like the Edgefield or for touring bands like Willie Nelson, Al Green, Los Lobos and hundreds more. His posters are traditionally made – hand drawn and hand cut or scratchboard originals, and of course, each is hand-pulled.  Each poster commemorates a show, special event or tour.  Each poster is a limited edition, every one numbered and signed by Houston himself.  As each edition is sold out, no more posters of that image are reproduced.

Houston has been doing poster art “for a lifetime.”  He drew since he could hold a crayon.  He attended Wichita State University and Bethany College in Kansas, studying sculpture, art history and drawing.  Houston has graciously donated his time and skills to charitable events and causes, including the Portland International School’s annual auction, and p:ear, an organization whose focus is to build positive relationships with homeless and transitional youth.  His work has been featured in countless venues and covered by notable reviewers, including Oregon Music News and Oregon Art Beat.  We are proud to share his work with you in honor of the great blues artists and the visual artists whose legacies are far too magnanimous for us to comprehend.

Pearl Gallery & Framing offers unframed prints of each poster on display and more work by Gary Houston.

It Aint Nothin’ but the Blues, a powerful PCS production running from May 22 – June 24, 2012 reveals a world where “its songs soothe the ear, occasionally work mischief on the funny bone and always raise the spirits.”
The New York Times

 

 Remembering Sharon - Chalk Pastel by Laura Walker Scott
AN EXHIBIT OF CHALK PASTELS
BY LAURA WALKER SCOTT

AND ORIGINAL ZIMBABWE ART

an installation for:
PORTLAND CENTER STAGE STUDIO LEVEL

April 13 – July 13, 2012

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In honor of Black Pearl Sings, we are curating an exhibit at the Portland Center Stage Studio Level Gallery, featuring the work of Portland-based artist Laura Walker Scott, whose vibrant chalk pastels light up our hearts and warm our senses.  Walker Scott has developed a unique style that is fresh and surprising.  Her subjects include starry skies, juicy fruit, flowers and oceans she has encountered through her travels as well as more conceptual pieces illustrating topics such as heartbreak and joy.  Her bold style has captured the attention and praise of collectors far and wide.  We have unframed limited edition prints of each Laura Walker Scott piece on display and more work in our Gallery.

An unlikely path led Laura to her current passion. Working as a grocery clerk, she was often recruited to make chalkboard signs. Although she had never drawn before, over time her confidence grew and she added small sketches to the signs. Her skills
improved and creating chalkboard signage became her full-time job. Five years later,
Laura pursued her passion fully and became the chalkboard artist that collectors know and love.

Image of Fabric Applique - Zimbabwe Artists Project
In support of the Zimbabwe Artists Project, we are featuring the work of women artists (and a few men) from rural Weya in Eastern Zimbabwe to help them become more economically self-sufficient.  Women of Weya are subsistence farmers, mothers, and householders as well as artists.  Most women live on their own, providing for families.  Some are widowed; others are single heads of households because throughout Zimbabwe, men leave the rural areas to seek work in cities.  Women’s income from agriculture is unpredictable and limited. Sales of their art helps women afford food, clothing, school fees, medicine, transport, seeds and fertilizer.  Since the market for Weya art in Zimbabwe is extremely limited, sales in the United States are critical.  Zimbabwe Artists Project pays much more than any other buyer, delivering cash at the time of purchase.  Equally important, Zimbabwe Artists Project provides health care to all of the artists, including care to artists who are HIV positive.  All proceeds go directly to the artists.

To learn more, visit http://zimbabweartistsproject.org/

 

 

L I M I N A L  F L O W:   L A N D S C A P E S  A T  T H E  E D G E


DEVON MITCHELL, Solo Exhibit

Stream Engine, Painting by Devon Mitchell

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June 7 – July 3, 2012

Pearl Gallery & Framing is excited to host Liminal Flow: Landscapes at the Edge, an exhibition of abstract landscape paintings by Oregon artist, Devon Mitchell, sponsored in part by Sitka Center for Art and Ecology.  Special thanks to Deschutes Brewing, the Vintner’s Society, Flamenco guitarist, Garth Brenamen and everyone who made the First Thursday art opening so very special!

Devon Mitchell’s work reveals the confluence of the industrial and natural worlds.  The juxtaposition of these contrasting realities is at the heart of her amazing compositions.  From her Portland studio, Mitchell paints overlooking Forest Park where it abuts Highway 30.  She captures provocative images at these margins.  Her paintings reflect places where colors and textures meet and converge.

Her process is like a mini-evolution.  She begins with wood panels and rabbit skin gesso, pouring and dripping inks to create an initial layer of texture and color.  With subsequent layers of oil paint and cold wax, Mitchell transforms random texture and color into suggestive forms and landscapes.  Her conceptual exploration ultimately leads her to produce paintings that embody the dynamic tension between abstraction and representation.

Mitchell began painting when she was two years old at the Berkeley Child Art Studio in California.  Over a ten year period, she developed her passion for artistic expression under the guidance of Miriam de Uriarte.  This magical and messy studio, its walls and floors blanketed with drips of paint, inspired Mitchell’s earliest explorations into painting, and continues to serve as a source of inspiration for her work and in her latest endeavor.  She is the founder of Portland Child Art Studio, a new nonprofit organization in Portland, Oregon that will recreate for a new generation of children the inspirational studio experience that served as a springboard for Devon Mitchell’s art career.

Mitchell received formal training in Colombia and at Portland State University.  While living in Bogota, she served in a private apprenticeship with Miguel Moyano, who provided her with an intensive educational introduction to formal drawing and painting.  She has since completed a BA in painting from Portland State University.  Her work has been shown in both group and solo exhibitions, and was most recently shown in the 2011 Sitka Art Invitational.

Devon Mitchell’s work is stunning and collectible.

 

Amazing Encaustic Painting by Kelly Williams

SOLO EXHIBITION:

KELLY WILLIAMS

INTERNAL LANDSCAPES

May 3 – June 5, 2012

Sneak Preview Held at Portland Center Stage
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Internal Landscapes is an exhibit of encaustic paintings in honor of Oregon-raised Artist, Mark Rothko.  Williams seeks to express the fact that what happens on the outside and what exists on the inside often differ dramatically. These paradoxes are explored through color and texture, physically manifesting the reflection within the artwork. The layering process inherent to encaustic symbolizes the passage of time and the build-up of experiences, one covering another, blending and altering the final visible perception. The use of fire and heat in the creation process reveals deeply buried layers. Layers are also visible through the gouging, scraping, and marking of the wax. The end result is a complicated, intense tactile work. We invite you to gently touch the art, feeling both the subtle smoothness and roughly gouged qualities.

This body of work, very different from Williams’ more representational work, is the artist’s attempt to map her own internal landscape with luminous color and texture, much as Mark Rothko sought to do in his work. Rothko had an invaluable ability to capture raw, emotional experience by using only washes of color, both intense and subdued, along with implied texture within the paint. His work is an exceptional inspiration in Williams’ own quest to symbolize the universal paradoxes of the human condition.

Kelly Williams has shown extensively both locally and nationally. She is a philanthropist, a community-involved artist generously giving her time and skills to serve recovery programs, arts education and collaborative art collectives. Williams developed a Regional Arts and Culture Council-funded project entitled Recovery Panes, working with those affected by addiction. Her work is included in the collections of several local businesses, and has been featured in many local and national publications.

Williams works in the medium of encaustic paint. Encaustic painting is an ancient medium dating back to early Greek and Egyptian art. The paint is made from melted beeswax mixed with pigment and resin. Each layer is fused with a heat implement such as a torch or iron before new layers can be added. Carving tools are used to incise lines and shapes and add sculptural elements, bringing the painted surface beyond its traditional two-dimensions.  Her work is full of life, one-of-a-kind, collectible, and stunning.  See some of the works shown in a sneak preview installation held at PCS Mezzanine.

 

amazing photo of 4 Portland Bridges by Tekoah Buchanan

SOLO EXHIBITION: TEKOAH BUCHANAN

industek visions ?

More About this Artist (Prints Available)

April 5 – May 1, 2012
(Upstairs Gallery)

It’s Portland Photo Month!  Join us in celebrating the art, history and practice of photography during Portland’s city-wide focus on photography. Pearl Gallery & Framing is excited to feature local artist Tekoah Buchanan’s stunning large-scale photographic images of Portland, Oregon, fantastic representations of our very own bridges, waterways and streets.

The exhibit focuses on industrial areas of Portland from an up close and personal perspective.  Tekoah Buchanan shares images that reveal his lifelong quest to translate our fast-paced industrial world into pictorial works, revealing the beauty of our everyday world in gentles tones of blue, warm hues of gray.  Buchanan’s photographic images have a hand-colored look, and they are printed large-scale by Pearl Printing on fine art canvas and satin cloth.

Tekoah Buchanan, a graduate of University of Oregon’s Electronic Media Production program, is obsessed with photography.  His photographic eye is constantly trained on the world around him; he is a natural at capturing city scenes.  He has spent countless hours in the darkroom, experimented with emulsion techniques, and worked on video production.  Buchanan’s roots are in film and video, having mixed Super 8 Film shorts with video footage in his college days.  He became intrigued with the idea of stopping film, and he began to create several series of still image photos from the footage that would typically be seen only as moving pictures.

He named his process of transforming moving images to still shots “industek visions ?” to brand his process, his style and his imagery.  It is a combination of “industrial” and “Tekoah,” his unusual first name, meaning sound of the trumpet.  The question mark  represents our shared humanity, our attempts to understand the world around us, the way that we use our analytical minds to perceive, but our emotional bewilderment at the grandeur of life with a future unknown.  “industek visions ?” represents an open-eyed look at reality that encompasses infinite possibilities.

We welcome photography-lovers to see this well-respected artist’s industek vision, on display through April.

 

Urban Landscapes by Brian CarterSOLO EXHIBITION: BRIAN CARTER

URBAN LANDSCAPES

More About this Artist (Prints Available)

April 5 – May 1, 2012
(Downstairs Gallery)

We are pleased to exhibit the work of Pacific Northwest graphic artist and illustrator, Brian Carter. His work reveals beautifully layered images, a photographic world unhindered by limitations. His subject matter varies greatly, offering vivid spectrum’s of color, urban environments with dramatic lighting styles and distinctive local landscapes.

Carter loved to draw since he was a boy and was introduced to the world of computers at age ten. It wasn’t long before he began experimenting with “code” to create colorful drawings and designs. His interest began with a computer aided drafting course in High School. Carter went on to earn his BS degree in Graphic Design from the Art Institute of Portland. The degree led him to the printing industry. His twelve-year career as a printing operator and color work specialist have focused his eye for detail and helped to push his art to new levels.

Brian owns and operates Pearl Printing, one of the nation’s most reputable fine art reproduction companies, specializing in archival digital printing on canvas and fine art papers, using archival inks. Pearl Printing also offers a highly professional approach with a staff that is friendly, knowledgeable, and willing to take the time and care to bring you a reproduction of your work that truly lives up to the original.

Christopher Mooney

BRIDGES:
AN EXHIBITION OF THE WORK
OF CHRISTOPHER MOONEY

March 1 -  April 3, 2012

Pearl Gallery & Framing is thrilled to host BRIDGES, an exhibition of the work of Christopher Mooney. A local celebrity in architectural painting, Mooney has made substantial contributions to the visual documentation of urban landmarks in Portland. As a painter of Oregon’s transportation architecture, Mooney reveals Portland as a city of rivers and bridges, showcasing the character, function and form of these icons. He is fascinated by the way in which geometric shapes of steel girders frame the landscape of the city.

People cross bridges every day. See BRIDGES, and with each new crossing, you will celebrate the powerful engineering achievements these feats of architecture represent. The bridges of Portland improve commerce, connect communities, and unite the city. Mooney honors bridges by painting them from unusual points of view, giving them dramatic perspectives, rendering them both realistic and abstract. Light plays an important role in his paintings, illuminating structures, casting shadows, and encouraging viewers to see bridges in new ways, directing our attention to details that we might not otherwise observe.

Mooney has a BFA in Illustration from Parson’s School of Design, New York, New York. His work has been the subject of numerous group and solo exhibitions. He is a member of Portland Open Studios and has won several awards for his painting. His work, cityscape was used as the cover and poster publicizing the book, Rental Sales Gallery, Portland Art Museum, The First 50 Years, in 2009. His work has been featured in Hawthorne Bridge, Celebrating 100 Years in Art and Words, a 2010 calendar supporting the Hawthorne Bridge Centennial Celebration.

We are proud to feature this local artist, his BRIDGES will surely transport you!

 

INTERNAL LANDSCAPES SNEAK PREVIEW
AN EXHIBITION OF THE WORK OF KELLY WILLIAMS

March 14 – April 6, 2012
Sneak preview of May 2012 Exhibit

PORTLAND CENTER STAGE
MEZZANINE LEVEL
128 Northwest 11th Avenue
Portland, OR 97209

This show, entitled Internal Landscapes, seeks to express the fact that what happens on the outside and what exists on the inside often differ dramatically. These paradoxes are explored through color and texture, physically manifesting the reflection within the artwork. The layering process inherent to encaustic symbolizes the passage of time and the build-up of experiences, one covering another, blending and altering the final visible perception. The use of fire and heat in the creation process reveals deeply buried layers. Layers are also visible through the gouging, scraping, and marking of the wax. The end result is a complicated, intense tactile work.  We invite you to gently touch the art, feeling both the subtle smoothness and roughly gouged qualities.

This body of work, very different from her more representational work, is Williams’ attempt to map her own internal landscape with luminous color and texture, much as Mark Rothko sought to do in his work. Rothko had an invaluable ability to capture raw, emotional experience by using only washes of colour, both intense and subdued, along with implied texture within the paint.  His work is an exceptional inspiration in Williams’ own quest to symbolize the universal paradoxes of the human condition.

Kelly Williams has shown extensively both locally and nationally.  She is a philanthropist, a community-involved artist generously giving her time and skills to serve recovery programs, arts education and collaborative art collectives.  Williams developed a Regional Arts and Culture Council-funded project entitled Recovery Panes, working with those affected by addiction. Her work is included in the collections of several local businesses, and has been featured in many local and national publications.

Williams works in the medium of encaustic paint.  Encaustic painting is an ancient medium dating back to early Greek and Egyptian art.  The paint is made from melted beeswax mixed with pigment and resin.  Each layer is  fused with a heat implement such as a torch or iron before new layers can be added.  Carving tools are used to incise lines and shapes and add sculptural elements, bringing the painted surface beyond its traditional two-dimensions. Her work is full of life, one-of-a-kind, collectible, and stunning.  In May 2012, Pearl Gallery & Framing will feature Kelly Williams in our Gallery.

 

ANNUAL BUNNY HOP

 

Saturday, March 31st – 11am to 2pm

It’s the annual Bunny Hop, a free family event.  Everyone is welcome – kids especially!  Hop by Pearl Gallery & Framing for special TREATS, adorn your outfit with BUNNY EARS or make a stand-up BUNNY CARD.  We’re excited to participate once again in this growing Pearl District event!

 

COLLABORATIONS: NATHAN PETZ AND EMILY KAY

February 2 – February 29, 2012  (Upstairs Gallery)

Collaborations by Nathan Petz and Emily Kay

For the month of February, Pearl Gallery & Framing is pleased to host COLLABORATIONS, an exhibition of the combined work of Nathan Petz & Emily Kay, two Portland-based artists whose collaborative oil paintings are sure to beautify your space. Most unique about this show is the fact that these artists share the canvas. Yes, that’s right, these artists actually work on the same canvas, each adding his or her own unique style to the same canvas. Petz and Kay execute unique oil paintings presenting images that are sure to enrich your home or office. Showcased images in the series we are proud to exhibit this February include owls, dogs and floral works that are sure to make you smile. The paintings in this collection are the first in these artists’ shared venture and are sure to become collectible.

Petz is a world traveler, having been a working artist in Germany. He owns a successful tattoo shop in Portland. Petz has over fifteen years of sketching, painting and tattooing experience. Over the past seven years, he has been perfecting his oil painting techniques and developed a style all his own. Kay studied printmaking, drawing, sculpture and painting in college and pursued her career in tattooing afterward, where she met Petz. Now together, they are collaborating in creating oil painting series.

 

SCENES FROM EASTSIDE PDX: SHAWN DEMAREST

February 2 – February 29, 2012 (Downstairs Gallery)

Shawn DemarestFor the fabulous month of February, we are also featuring the unrivaled work of Portland artist, Shawn Demarest, in our downstairs gallery space.

Demarest has been a featured artist in galleries regionally and nationally, having had group exhibitions as well as solo shows in Taos, New Mexico & Portland, Oregon.

She says, “My work is a response to my surroundings. Whether painting from observation or in the studio, my natural drive is to represent the visual world I find myself in. Currently as a resident of Portland, Oregon, I am painting neighborhood views. Notably, much of this work represents city streets I walk, bike, or drive on. I seek out compositions, patterns, light, and weather scenes that speak to me and respond by drawing out and expressing their essential qualities. I also paint from observation, often along the Willamette River that cuts through Portland. All of my paintings, both studio and observation, begin as loose, gestural drawings. As they develop, my interest turns to more formal aspects of painting ,edge, contrast, and composition.”

Her paintings are unbelievably realistic in the way that glass windows reflect surrounding images, yet there are qualities to the images so intangible that you are drawn into the paintings completely – this is just purely amazing collectable art for your unique space.

Don’t miss this show at Pearl Gallery & Framing this February. In addition to our featured artists, we have gifts and fine art to brighten your life! You can discover something for everyone: silver rings, gemstone earrings, glass pendants, images of Portland, floral photo coasters, botanical etchings, original chalk pastels, ceramics, wire sculptures, mini-encaustics, hand-pulled Rock & Roll screen prints, lithographs, prints, ready-made frames and much more!

We are happy to work with you personally to frame your art, or envision the perfect art combination to liven up the space in your home or office.


Want to take home a piece of Portland?

Pearl Gallery Upstairs

Looking for gifts?

Pearl Gallery & Framing features local artists, emerging and established. Media include original oil paintings, encaustic, limited edition prints, pencil/chalk drawings, one-of-a-kind jewelry, ceramic and metal sculptures – something for everyone, including limited edition rock posters, botanical etchings, colorful pastels and images of Bridgetown spanning 100 years. We also sell antique prints (botanical images, birds, bridges, circus scenes and more), offer canvas stretching and more.
Please inquire.

Visit family-owned Pearl Gallery & Framing:

9 am to 5 pm Weekdays
11 am to 5 pm Saturdays
and every First Thursday until 9 pm

Feel free to contact us with any questions.

Map to Gallery